Related
Exhibition
May 2019

Hero Ready: The University of Texas at Austin 2019 MFA Thesis Exhibition

The University of Texas at Austin

Nima Bahrehmand. “operation.wtf,” 2019. Multichannel video installation with sound.

Nima Bahrehmand. “operation.wtf,” 2019. Multichannel video installation with sound.

Ariel René Jackson. “The (next) life of property : grandma never believed in hell,” 2019. Installation.

Ariel René Jackson. “The (next) life of property : grandma never believed in hell : seated up high,” 2019. Grandma’s chair, wire, concrete, Tampico corn broom, wire, soil, plastic, chalkboard paint, chalk, flag pole.

Sarah Fagan. “500 Washers and One Butterfly,” (detail), 2019. Objects collected from sidewalks in fifteen U.S. cities, entomology pins, wood, mirrors, house paint, charcoal.

Sarah Fagan. “500 Washers and One Butterfly,” 2019. Objects collected from sidewalks in fifteen U.S. cities, entomology pins, wood, mirrors, house paint, charcoal.

Wyatt Ramsey. “Artist and Muse,” 2018. Photograph by Marisa LaGuardia.

Wyatt Ramsey. “Big Boy,” 2019. Charcoal mural by Drue Henegar.

Stephen-Bernard Derek Callender. “Supercontinent: The Coalescing,” (detail), 2019

Stephen-Bernard Derek Callender. “Supercontinent: The Coalescing,” 2019. Video, OSB, MDF, collected foam waste from the Colorado, pink foam, Styrofoam, foam packaging, LCD screens, RGB LED light strip, miscellaneous electronics, ceramics, soil collected from Pikesville, Maryland, bush stump, birds’ nest, rubble from Austin, Texas, highway infrastructure, fish tank, axolotl, surgical titanium finger pins, vacuum bags, tinted Plexiglas, algorithmically modified audio, gypsum sand from White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, brick from 2015 Baltimore riots, alternator, obsidian, Tyvek suits, structural components from Marisa LaGuardia’s “Moments of Collision,” found objects.

Brooke Frank. “Be My Neighbor,” 2019. Charcoal and oil on panel. “Capture,” 2019. Oil graphite and silverpoint on paper.

Brooke Frank. “Protections and Liability,” 2019. Oil, graphite, silverpoint and silver leaf on paper. “A Boy and His Dog,” 2019. Oil and graphite on panel.

Matthew Cronin. Installation view, 2019.

Matthew Cronin. “Untitled (Nightstand),” 2019. Archival inkjet print.

Mark Kovitya. “Osmotic Accumulations,” 2019. Polyurethane, polyurethane foam, polystyrene, Tyvek, cardboard, steel, wire, landscape fabric, nylon, ash, coffee grounds, sawdust, egg shells, quartz, duct tape, padded envelopes, burlap, denim, ratchet strap, wax, epoxy, acrylic.

Mark Kovitya. “Osmotic Accumulations,” 2019. Polyurethane, polyurethane foam, polystyrene, Tyvek, cardboard, steel, wire, landscape fabric, nylon, ash, coffee grounds, sawdust, egg shells, quartz, duct tape, padded envelopes, burlap, denim, ratchet strap, wax, epoxy, acrylic.

Renee Lai. “Barrier VI,” 2019. Graphite and oil stick on canvas.

Renee Lai. Installation view, 2019.

Shanie Tomassini. “The Cheetos Puff Experiment,” (detail), 2019. Cheetos, acrylic farms, mealworms, Styrofoam, mealworm castings, pewter, sulfur, gypsum prints, steel.

Shanie Tomassini. Installation view, 2019.

Ling-lin Ku. “A Fever Called Living,” 2019. 3D prints, UV prints, digital prints, foam, bendy ply, MDF, wood, plaster, papier-mâché, rubber, sand, metal, plywood, fabric, Plexiglas, wood glue, paint, ant, glass.

Ling-lin Ku. “A Fever Called Living,” (detail), 2019.

Through a broad range of disciplinary practices, the artists in Hero Ready introduce questions of analysis, subjectivity, agency, and power. What constitutes an art object, and how do we make this distinction? How does art impact our thinking and why? How is our attention held when we look—by whom, and toward what?

Hero Ready presents the culminating work of students receiving Master of Fine Arts degrees in Studio Art. All photos by Matthew Cronin.

About the MFA Studio Art program
Over their course of study, MFA students in Studio Art work closely with department faculty to fine-tune existing skill sets and develop new approaches, both conceptual and technical, to their studio practices. In a challenging interdisciplinary environment, students often work across media and in close collaboration with one another, exploring the potential overlaps and depths of established disciplines. The department’s visiting artist and critic program brings acclaimed professionals from outside the university into graduate studios. As part of the diverse intellectual community that makes up The University of Texas at Austin, students have access to resources across campus allowing for a richly informed approach to art making.

About the Department of Art and Art History
The Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin is one of the largest and most diverse in the country. It includes the divisions of Art Education, Art History, and Studio Art and reflects the rigorous standards of a flagship institution, while offering an intimate environment for students to train as scholars, practitioners, and educators in the arts. The department's twenty-two full-time Studio Art faculty work closely with the program's graduate art students. The faculty proudly celebrates these eleven artists whose culminating exhibition, Hero Ready, completes their graduate education.

Participating Artists

Nima Bahrehmand
Stephen-Bernard Derek Callender
Matthew Cronin
Sarah Fagan
Brooke Frank
Ariel René Jackson 
Mark Kovitya
Ling-lin Ku
Renee Lai
Wyatt Ramsey
Shanie Tomassini

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