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Announcement
June 27, 2017

Public lecture series at the Art + Research Center Summer Intensive 2017

Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (ICA Miami)

Photo: anthonioo & Mei-Ling via Flickr Creative Commons.

Admission is free with required RSVP

Houston Cypress: July 12, 7–9pm
Stephanie Wakefield: July 15, 2–4pm
Claire Colebrook: July 18, 7–9pm
Nicholas Mirzoeff: July 20, 7–9pm

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (ICA Miami) announces a series of free public lectures as part of its first annual Art + Research Center (A+RC) Summer Intensive, which aims to address how urgent climate change issues and anthropogenic effects influence contemporary cultural production. The four public lectures will run July 12, 15, 18 and 20, and continue ICA Miami’s dedication to open access and experimentation during the transition from its temporary location in the Moore Building to its new permanent home in the Miami Design District, opening December 1, 2017.

The Art + Research Center 2017 Summer Intensive lectures explore topics ranging from Miami’s current and near-term environmental conditions, to the Everglades waterways, to abstract questions around what it means to produce art on a planet that is rapidly changing, and how they urgently relate to current cultural production. Summer Intensive visiting faculty include theorist and cultural producers from around the country and Miami, including Miccosukee activist Reverend Houston Cypress, visual studies pioneer and activist Nicholas Mirzoeff, theorist Claire Colebrook, and urban geographer Stephanie Wakefield.

“We are proud to announce the newest series of A+RC lectures as part of ICA Miami's first Summer Intensive,” said Gean Moreno, Curator of Programs. “Especially in Miami, it is important to consider how cultural producers are responding, and how they should respond to a reality we can’t ignore, ultimately touching on the question of how cultural production can support social awareness and change.”

This is the third semester of A+RC programs since ICA Miami’s launch of the initiative in October 2016. Previous topics of inquiry have included an exploration of the new levels of complexity that organize our modern world, as well as the growing impact of technology on culture and artistic practice, led by faculty such as Hito Steyerl, Simon Denny, Evan Calder Williams, Ana Teixeira Pinto, Luciana Parisi, Sven Lutticken, Orit Halpern and Lucy Raven.

Visiting Faculty

Reverend Houston Cypress
Wednesday, July 12, 7–9pm

Reverend Houston Cypress is a poet, artist, environmental activist and ordained minister. Through his organization, Love the Everglades Movement, Cypress has become a major force within Miccosukee society as an advocate for cultural preservation, environmental protection, business development and sovereignty. Cypress also acts as a cultural ambassador, leading the way for meaningful exchange and connection between his society of clans and the outside world.

Stephanie Wakefield
Saturday, July 15, 2–4pm

Stephanie Wakefield is an urban geographer and Assistant Professor in Culture and Media at Eugene Lang College at The New School. She has written and organized extensively around the political and philosophical questions of the Anthropocene, exploring it as a threshold moment of both great potential and catastrophe. She is finalizing a book on the being, time and politics of oysters, "living infrastructures" of urban resilience in post-Sandy New York. Her new research explores urban "experimentation" as a mode of dwelling in the Anthropocene and emancipatory possibilities offered by the concept of the "back loop."

Claire Colebrook
Tuesday, July 18, 7–9pm

Claire Colebrook is the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English at Penn State University. She has published books and articles on contemporary European philosophy, queer theory, visual culture, poetry, literary history gender studies and literary theory. Her most recent book is Twilight of the Anthropocene Idols, co-authored with Tom Cohen and J. Hillis Miller.

Nicholas Mirzoeff
Thursday, July 20, 7–9pm

Nicholas Mirzoeff is a visual activist, working at the intersection of politics and global/digital visual culture. His most recent book, How To See The World, was published by Pelican in the UK (2015) and by Basic Books in the US (2016). Mirzoeff is considered one of the founders of the academic discipline of visual culture in books like An Introduction to Visual Culture (1999/2009) and (as editor) The Visual Culture Reader (1998/2002/2012). His new project, The Appearance of Black Lives Matter is to be published as a free e-book by NAME Publications, Miami.

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