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Announcement
February 4, 2016

Spring 2016 exhibitions

Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University
Rosalyn Drexler, Love and Violence (detail), 1963. Ben Hagari, Potter’s Will (still, detail), 2015. Sharon Lockhart, Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets by Noa Eshkol (still, detail), 2011.*

Exhibitions
Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?
Sharon Lockhart / Noa Eshkol
Rose Video 08 | Ben Hagari: Potter’s Will
Rose Collection: #FordHall2015

The Rose Art Museum announces the opening of its spring exhibitions on February 12. A reception will be held from 5–9 on February 11 and is free and open to the public.

About the exhibitions:

Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is? explores the multidisciplinary practice of Rosalyn Drexler (b. 1926), showcasing major paintings and collages from the 1960s through the present, as well as Drexler’s captivating early sculptures, award winning plays and novels, and photographic and video documentation of the artist’s wild and varied theatrical career. Drexler’s art resonates with the cool Pop art of the ’60s, yet addresses sexual politics with unique frankness; along with central themes of love and violence, she explores mid-century masculinity and her own identity as a woman, writer, and artist. As Drexler has reflected, “I didn’t have any preconceived ideas about what I should be, or that I should only be one thing.” Co-curated by Rose Curator-at-Large Katy Siegel and Curatorial Assistant Caitlin Julia Rubin, this exhibition celebrates Drexler’s unique spirit, presenting her as both a sharp critic of and a joyful participant in American culture of the past 50 years.

Sharon Lockhart / Noa Eshkol presents the multi-channel film installation Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets by Noa Eshkol (2011), through which Los Angeles-based artist Sharon Lockhart (b. 1964) explores the extraordinary work of Noa Eshkol (1924–2007), an Israeli dance composer, theorist, and textile artist. Although the two women never met, the project is conceived as a two-person exhibition, highlighting a fascinating artistic convergence between past and present. Collaborating with Eshkol’s students as well as a newer generation of dancers, Lockhart staged and filmed performances of Eshkol’s choreography in a gallery-like setting punctuated only by Eshkol’s remarkable wall carpets, rotated from dance to dance like elements in a stage set. In Sharon Lockhart / Noa Eshkol, organized by Curator Kim Conaty, films of five dances are projected simultaneously on freestanding walls, allowing visitors to reflect upon their own movement as they traverse the exhibition space.

Rose Video 08 presents Potter’s Will (2016) by Ben Hagari (b. 1981). In this multimedia video installation, curated by Faculty Curator Gannit Ankori, a potter’s whirling studio is on display as both a physical site and a projected sight, inviting the audience to engage in an immersive experience that melds the prehistoric art of pottery-making with contemporary video art. The display oscillates between the moving set and the moving image, evoking creation myths and mythic creations.Hagari is the inaugural recipient of The Chami Fruchter Prize for an emerging Israeli video artist, a biennial award administered jointly by the Rose Art Museum and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.

Inspired by the just demands of Brandeis University students for immediate actions promoting racial awareness and inclusion (#FordHall2015), the Rose Art Museum has committed its Lee Gallery to Rose Collection: #FordHall2015, an installation of work from the museum’s holdings that will serve as a catalyst for dialogue and exchange regarding issues of cultural bias, race, and the intersection of art and activism. The presentation will be accompanied by a series of workshops and close-looking sessions related to injustice and inequality.

 

Spring 2016 programs at Rosebud
Inaugurated in September 2015, Rosebud is the Rose Art Museum’s satellite gallery at 683 Main Street in downtown Waltham, featuring works of video art.

February 11–27
Mary Reid Kelley with Patrick Kelley, The Syphilis of Sisyphus (2011)

March 3–April 3
Theaster Gates, Gone Are the Days of Shelter and Martyr (2014), the U.S. premiere of the acclaimed work first presented at the 56th Venice Biennale in 2015

 

For more information on the Rose’s spring exhibitions and programs, please visit the museum’s website.

Press inquiries: Nina Berger, [email protected] / T 617 543 1595

These exhibitions and associated programs are made possible through funding from the Rose Art Exhibit Fund, the Lois Foster Exhibition Fund, and The 2015 Chami Fruchter Prize for an emerging Israeli video artist.

 

*Rosalyn Drexler, Love and Violence (detail), 1963. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. Ben Hagari, Potter’s Will (still, detail), 2015. Courtesy the Artist. Sharon Lockhart, Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets by Noa Eshkol (still, detail), 2011. Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels; and neugerriemschneider, Berlin.

 

Spring 2016 exhibitions opening at The Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University

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