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Two events on Animism
e-flux
Above: Ken Jacobs, Let There Be Whistle Blowers, 2005. Film still, black-and-white and color with sound, 18 minutes. Courtesy of the artist.
Above: Ken Jacobs, Let There Be Whistle Blowers, 2005. Film still, black-and-white and color with sound, 18 minutes. Courtesy of the artist.

e-flux is pleased to present two events organized with Anselm Franke, curator of the exhibition Animism, on view at e-flux until July 28.

Animism screening

Ken Jacobs introduces his works Let There Be Whistle Blowers (2005), The Green Wave (2011), and Flo Rounds A Corner (1999) followed by screenings of Antje Majewski‘s interview with Thomas and Helke Bayrle (2011), and Jean Painleve‘s Love life of the Octopus (1967).

Thursday, July 19, 8:30pm
more here

e-flux
311 East Broadway
3rd Floor
New York, NY

Animism closing event: “The Vanishing Point of the Modern”
With Anselm FrankeTom KeenanSpyros Papapetros, and Elizabeth Povinelli

Animism can be called the “vanishing point of the modern” for its opposition to modern rationalities, meaning the point where modernity “disappears.” It is also a “vanishing point” in the sense of its importance and notoriety for the “modern perspective,” particularly in this moment as we try to develop new perspectives both on animism and the modern legacy.

Anselm Franke, curator of AnimismTom Keenan, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Director of the Human Rights Project at Bard College, Spyros Papapetros, Assistant Professor, History and Theory of Architecture at Princeton University, and Elizabeth Povinelli, Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University, will each present on this subject, marking the close of Animism on view at e-flux until July 28.

Thursday, July 26, 6.30pm
more here

e-flux
311 East Broadway
3rd Floor
New York, NY

Animism
e-flux presents the fifth iteration of Animism, curated by Anselm Franke. The exhibition rethinks the question of animation not by investigating the effect of animation within aesthetics, but by tackling the unquestioned backdrop against which such aesthetic effects are discussed. This backdrop is the discourse of animism: a term defined by nineteenth century anthropologists searching for mankind’s alleged primitive, original religion, which they identified as the erroneous animation of the surrounding world. Outside the field of art and mass media, discussions on animation turn into an ontological battleground at the frontier of colonial modernity.

With With Marcel Broodthaers, Walt Disney, Jimmie Durham, Harun Farocki, Tom Holert, Luis Jacob, Ken Jacobs, Joachim Koester, Len Lye, Chris Marker, Daria Martin, Angela Melitopoulos & Maurizio Lazzarato, Ana Mendieta, Vincent Monnikendam, Spyros Papapetros, Alain Resnais, and Natascha Sadr Haghighian.

Read reviews of the exhibition by the New York Times and artinfo.

e-flux exhibition space
311 East Broadway
New York, NY
www.e-flux.com

Tuesday–Saturday, 12–6pm
April 26–July 28, 2012
more here

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July 16, 2012