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Paris flooding threatens museum artwork

From Watershed Ways

That pantheon, those bubbles. We return to the water, rising along the Seine, threatening to creep into vaults of commissioned culture. A vision of a future museum in which the depots are emptied out and brought to the surface. In their recent report “The Restitution of African Cultural Heritage–Towards A New Relational Ethics” (2018), Felwine Sarr and Bénédicte Savoy dredge some of that history of “appropriation and alienation” with propositions of archival renegotiation and memory work, as well as the recirculation of cultural heritage objects as dynamic repositories of relational history. Relational restitution as participatory practice in “a world irremediably trampled upon.”1 The Seine’s rise, with its damage and debris, brings with it that time for participation in an endangered present of flood and drought.

1 Felwine Sarr and Bénédicte Savoy, “The Restitution of African Cultural Heritage–Towards A New Relational Ethics,” 2018, 40.

September 13, 2019

CNN

Curated by

Clare Butcher