News

  • 24

    Norman Schureman (1959–2010)

    More than one hundred students, friends, and family gathered on Monday afternoon to remember Norman Schureman, a fifty-year-old Pasadena art professor at the Art Center College of Design slain at a party in Westlake Village over the weekend, reports the Pasadena Star-News. Schureman, who taught sketching and product design, was shot to death at a party celebrating Persian New Year, police officials said. The many people who spoke at Monday’s impromptu service remembered Schureman as a close friend to many students. His father, Bob, himself a teacher at the Art Center, spoke about the importance that the school and students had for his son. “Norm, he loved this place,” said Schureman. “You’ve all been a part of his life.” He said his son had wanted to go to the college since he was a child. At Monday’s event, Lorne Buchman, the school’s president, said that the Arts Center will create a scholarship in Norm Schureman’s name. Said Buchman, “Norman was a beloved instructor, colleague, mentor, and friend of hundreds of Art Center students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Norm’s relationship with Art Center began almost forty years ago when his father, Bob Schureman, taught classes in the ID department and Norm would tag along as a young curious creative. Years later, Norm launched his official design career after graduating from Art Center in Industrial Design. He returned to the college to teach at Art Center Europe and then Pasadena. Both Norm and Bob have inspired hundreds of design students over the years.” More from Buchman’s statement can be found here.
  • 23

    New French Program Encourages Diversity among Curatorial Students

    The French museum world is taking a step toward multiculturalism—not in its exhibitions, but among its employees. As Le Monde’s Nathaniel Herzberg reports, three major elite institutions responsible for educating museum experts—the Institut National du Patrimoine (INP), the Ecole du Louvre, and the Ecole des Chartes—have just announced the creation of an “integrated preparatory class” for candidates competing for a study place to become a curator for heritage. The creation of the integrated preparatory class—which aims at making the pool of candidates more diversified—follows similar moves to open up other French educational institutions, from the elite political science institute to police training schools. “It’s the cultural sector’s turn to answer the call for diversity,” writes Herzberg. After obtaining the prestigious title of heritage curator, an individual will have access to the best jobs in museums, libraries, and archival centers across the country. The competition for study places is tough and requires not only studies in art history but also “a considerable cultural and academic baggage” according to INP director Eric Gross—cultural capital that successful candidates have begun to accrue as children of privileged families. While Gross wants to give everyone the same chance, there will be no quotas, nor affirmative action. In August, ten to twelve motivated candidates will be picked according to social criteria that allow them to obtain grants for higher education. These candidates will be expected to pass the same tests and meet the same criteria as other hopefuls in the competition for study places at the institutions. But the candidates will come to the competition with the advantage of a different preparation. The initiators behind the new project—which is being financially supported by the foundation Culture & Diversité—expect only 25 percent of the candidates to “win” the competition. That means only three from the ten to twelve candidates will actually become students next fall at INP, which has only forty study places available each year. According to Gross, only one candidate with a diverse background succeeded in obtaining a study place in 2009 at the INP—the very first in the entire history of the institution.

    New French Program Encourages Diversity among Curatorial Students

    The French museum world is taking a step toward multiculturalism—not in its exhibitions, but among its employees. As Le Monde’s Nathaniel Herzberg reports, three major elite institutions responsible for educating museum experts—the Institut National du Patrimoine (INP), the Ecole du Louvre, and the Ecole des Chartes—have just announced the creation of an “integrated preparatory class” for candidates competing for a study place to become a curator for heritage. The creation of the integrated preparatory class—which aims at making the pool of candidates more diversified—follows similar moves to open up other French educational institutions, from the elite political science institute to police training schools. “It’s the cultural sector’s turn to answer the call for diversity,” writes Herzberg. After obtaining the prestigious title of heritage curator, an individual will have access to the best jobs in museums, libraries, and archival centers across the country. The competition for study places is tough and requires not only studies in art history but also “a considerable cultural and academic baggage” according to INP director Eric Gross—cultural capital that successful candidates have begun to accrue as children of privileged families. While Gross wants to give everyone the same chance, there will be no quotas, nor affirmative action. In August, ten to twelve motivated candidates will be picked according to social criteria that allow them to obtain grants for higher education. These candidates will be expected to pass the same tests and meet the same criteria as other hopefuls in the competition for study places at the institutions. But the candidates will come to the competition with the advantage of a different preparation. The initiators behind the new project—which is being financially supported by the foundation Culture & Diversité—expect only 25 percent of the candidates to “win” the competition. That means only three from the ten to twelve candidates will actually become students next fall at INP, which has only forty study places available each year. According to Gross, only one candidate with a diverse background succeeded in obtaining a study place in 2009 at the INP—the very first in the entire history of the institution.
  • 15

    Director Retires at Sainsbury Center for Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia

    Nichola Johnson has been director of the Sainsbury Center for Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia since 1997. She is due to retire this summer and the center is looking for someone to take over. As director, Johnson has over-seen a major fifteen-million-dollar revamp lasting nearly two years, and abolished admission charges for the permanent collections. She also runs the university's museology program and is a past chairman of the national University Museums Group. She grew up in Suffolk and came to Norfolk to work at UEA in 1993. The Sainsbury Center opened in 1978 following the donation by Sir Robert and Lady Lisa Sainsbury of their collection of world art to the UEA. The collection includes works by Henry Moore, Alberto Giacometti, and Francis Bacon. There is also a program of temporary exhibitions, which currently include a display of artists' studios and the Anderson collection of art nouveau. The university is looking for someone who can “maintain and extend the centre's funding base and increase earned income,” while furthering its position “as one of the UK's leading university museums."
  • 09

    Director of University of Melbourne’s Art Museum to Chair Australian Studies at Harvard for 2011-2012

    Distinguished Australian art historian and director of the Ian Potter Museum of Art at the University of Melbourne Dr. Chris McAuliffe has been appointed to the chair of Australian Studies at Harvard University for the 2011/2012 academic year. The appointment by the Australian nominating committee for the chair is a dual one with professor Mick Dodson, director of the Australian National University’s National Center for Indigenous Studies. McAuliffe will be appointed to the department of art and architecture in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard. It is the first appointment in Australian art history to the department in over twenty years. That appointment was Professor Patrick McCaughey, director of the University of Melbourne’s Festival of Ideas. Chair of the Australian Nominating Committee for the Harvard Chair, Professor Graeme Davison, says that Chris McAuliffe combines an impressive record as a gallery director with first-rank scholarship. “His engaging style as a lecturer will appeal to Harvard students.” Dr. McAuliffe has written extensively on contemporary art and its relationship with sport, popular music, suburbia and Australian culture. During his appointment, he intends to develop closer links between academic programs and university collections as well as establish a dialogue between American and Australian art. McAuliffe’s research encompasses both Australian and American art.
  • 08

    Art Institute of Chicago Appoints New Chief Operating Officer

    The Art Institute of Chicago has appointed David Thurm as its new COO. Writes TAXI Design Network, “Thurm, who began his tenure at the Art Institute on March 1, 2010, will oversee the museum's general operations. Thurm's duties will include the strengthening of the museum's financial position and easing its transition to a more complex institution—which the museum has now become as a result of the addition of the Modern Wing and the multiyear reinstallation project currently underway. Thurm comes to the Art Institute after twenty-seven years at the New York Times, serving that company in many different capacities, including vice president for real estate operations—overseeing the management and construction of Renzo Piano's New York Times headquarters building—and Chief Operating Officer of New York Times Digital. Most recently, he was the newspaper's senior vice president for operations. Meredith Mack, the museum's former deputy director and COO, will be joining the leadership team at the Rise Group as EVP Institutional Sector as well as supporting company-wide strategic and operating initiatives.”

    Smith Grants Tenure and Promotions to Two Art Professors

    At its March meeting, the Smith College board of trustees approved tenure and promotion recommendations for ten faculty members. Among these, Dana Leibsohn, PP Van der Poel professor of art, was promoted to full professor. Meanwhile, Frazer Ward, in the art department, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure from assistant professor. Enrolling 2,800 students from every state and sixty other countries, Smith is the largest undergraduate women’s college in the United States.