News

  • 31

    University of Iowa Museum of Art Reopens

    The University of Iowa Museum of Art reopened after a month-long hiatus with roughly fifty art pieces in the IMU Richey Ballroom reports Alicia Kramme for the Daily Iowan. For the past two years, approximately 11,000 works of art have called the Figge Art Museum in Davenport home, displaced by the 2008 floods. "You just can't believe what it means to have some of the collection back," Dale Fisher, the University of Iowa Museum of Art director of education said. "Just a few pieces is a joy to us." UI officials appealed the Federal Emergency Management Agency's denial for funding to build a museum at a new location in July. The painting by Grant Wood titled Plaid Sweater is just one recently returned painting to the gallery. The museum closed for nearly a month to reinstall the partial collection in preparation for the school year. Some pieces sitting in the IMU were sent to Davenport, where the majority of the collection remains. The Stanley Gallery at the Levitt Center also houses part of the UI's African art collection. Fisher said swapping current pieces with ones in storage is crucial to completing the museum's mission: presenting its extensive collection of more than 12,000 pieces to its various audiences.
  • 30

    College of Santa Fe Becomes Santa Fe University of Art and Design

    Robert Nott reports for the New Mexican that the College of Santa Fe has been renamed the Santa Fe University of Art and Design. "Frankly, we didn't want you to drive by and see the name change without hearing from us," president John S. Gordon said. He otherwise struck a serious tone as he explained that the name change is intended to help brand the college as a magnet university for visual and performing arts. "Some people are disappointed that the College of Santa Fe no longer exists with that name," Gordon noted. "We know older alumni regret the name change. But the fact is, the old College of Santa Fe's strength was in the arts." Gordon's comments were echoed by Lawrence A. Hinz, who served as the college's interim president last year, after the Laureate Education Inc. chain took over the financially beleaguered institution founded by the Christian Brothers in 1859. "We're continuing down the path laid out by the predecessor staff," said Hinz, a senior vice president of Laureate. "This is an arts school." While the once nonprofit college was long known for having a broad liberal-arts component, its new leaders are emphasizing design, visual arts, photography, theater, film, and a renewed contemporary-music program. It has added sixteen new full-time faculty members, Gordon said, as well as a complement of contributing (adjunct) teachers. The college employs about seventy-five people in all. The College of Santa Fe became the Santa Fe University of Art and Design. "Frankly, we didn't want you to drive by and see the name change without hearing from us," president John S. Gordon said. He otherwise struck a serious tone as he explained that the name change is intended to help brand the college as a magnet university for visual and performing arts. "Some people are disappointed that the College of Santa Fe no longer exists with that name," Gordon noted. "We know older alumni regret the name change. But the fact is, the old College of Santa Fe's strength was in the arts." Gordon's comments were echoed by Lawrence A. Hinz, who served as the college's interim president last year, after the Laureate Education Inc. chain took over the financially beleaguered institution founded by the Christian Brothers in 1859. "We're continuing down the path laid out by the predecessor staff," said Hinz, a senior vice president of Laureate. "This is an arts school." While the once nonprofit college was long known for having a broad liberal-arts component, its new leaders are emphasizing design, visual arts, photography, theater, film, and a renewed contemporary-music program. It has added sixteen new full-time faculty members, Gordon said, as well as a complement of contributing (adjunct) teachers. The college employs about seventy-five people in all. Student enrollmenh, which hovered between 200 and 250 over the last two semesters, is up to about 375, Gordon said. Between sixty and eighty of those students are coming in from various campuses in Mexico that are accredited by Laureate, including the Universidad del Valle de Mexico. At least three students are from Spain. Student enrollmenh, which hovered between 200 and 250 over the last two semesters, is up to about 375, Gordon said. Between sixty and eighty of those students are coming in from various campuses in Mexico that are accredited by Laureate, including the Universidad del Valle de Mexico. At least three students are from Spain.
  • 25

    Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art Awarded Grant

    The Poughkeepsie Journal reports that the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at the State University of New York at New Paltz has been awarded a $150,000 collaborative Museums for America federal grant to develop an easy-to-search, Web-accessible database that will feature images and information for more than 13,000 objects from the collections of The Dorsky and four other Ulster County visual arts organizations. The Dorsky is the lead member of the Hudson Valley Visual Arts Consortium, which also includes the Center for Photography at Woodstock, the Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, and the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale. The project, “Art of the Hudson Valley and Beyond: The Digital Collections of the Hudson Valley Visual Arts Consortium,” has been funded by a federal Institute of Museum and Library Services grant supported by New Paltz graduate and U.S. Rep. Maurice Hinchey, D-Hurley. The institute is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. “We are thrilled to have received this grant, which will allow the museum to work with its colleagues in the region to showcase the art and artists of the Hudson Valley,” Dorsky museum director Sara Pasti said. “The public is in for a treat.”
  • 24

    University of South Carolina Closes Arts Institute

    Josh Dawsey for the Daily Game Cock reports that University of South Carolina will shut the doors of its Arts Institute in December, leaving some in the arts community disillusioned at the closure of an outreach effort that linked the campus with Columbia’s arts community. The decision was made this summer in wake of more budget cuts from the general assembly, which saw the university lose more than twenty percent of its state appropriations. It also means one full-time staff member and three part-time employees are out of a job come December. The institute, which opened in 2005, was designed to promote interdisciplinary performances between different schools and departments at USC. It also funded partnerships with various community entities, including the Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, the Richland County Public Library, and the A.C. Moore Elementary School, among other organizations. Its $200,000 yearly budget allowed it to fund performances in the community, promote USC faculty and students, counsel up-and-coming artists and bolster the University’s prestige in the arts community, director Kwame Dawes said. Dawes said it once received $250,000, but was slashed during budget cuts in recent years. “We don’t do a smart enough job of how we promote and support the arts, and this institute did that,” Dawes said. “The Arts Institute represented and was lauded as a gesture of the part of the university as part of its belief in the centrality of the arts, and it was a good avenue for artists to be involved at the university.” Dawes, an Emmy-winning artist and the university’s poet laureate, said he’s received numerous e-mails from arts supporters, expressing disappointment with the university’s decision to close the institute. The university remains committed to the arts in wake of the institute’s closing, provost Michael Amiridis said. He said over half of the institute’s budget went toward staffing, and in a budget crisis, that’s not the most effective spending on students. “It’ll actually be double the money for our students and programming,” Amiridis said. “This university is a place where the arts are supported and appreciated.” But that’s a flawed strategy, Dawes said. No matter how good an artist is, he or she can’t succeed without effective publicity.
  • 23

    Judge Rejects Fisk Deal to Sell O’Keeffes

    A judge on Friday rejected Fisk University's latest attempt to sell to an Arkansas museum a joint stake in a 101-piece collection donated to the school by the late artist Georgia O'Keeffe, reports the Associated Press. Judge Ellen Hobbs Lyle agreed with Fisk's argument at trial that the historically black university's precarious financial state makes the school unable to exhibit the collection. But the judge said the Fisk proposal to sell 50 percent to the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, for $30 million does not meet the terms of the donation O'Keeffe made to the school in 1949. "Fisk either needs assistance with the collection or Fisk needs to be replaced," Lyle said in the ruling. A spokesman for Fisk said officials were still reviewing the decision, and a message left with the Crystal Bridges museum was not immediately returned. The museum was founded by Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton. O'Keeffe donated the art to Fisk because the school, founded in 1866, educated blacks at a time when the South was segregated. Her purpose was to "enable the public -- in Nashville and the South -- to have the opportunity to study the collection," Lyle said in the ruling.
  • 19

    Fisk University Debating Sale of Georgia O’Keeffe Collection

    Fisk University President Hazel O’Leary testified that the school may be forced to close if it doesn’t sell off an art collection donated by artist Georgia O’Keeffe reports the Associated Press. But lawyers for the state of Tennessee, which is trying to block the sale, argued that the famous artist never intended for the school to sell the collection, and the sale would actually drive away potential Fisk donors. “What donor in their right mind is going to give money to Fisk when they know that when they’re dead, Fisk is going to do whatever it wants with it,” deputy attorney general Janet Kleinfelter asked. Testimony continues Friday in the Chancery Court trial, which began Wednesday. It will determine the fate of the 101-piece Steiglitz collection, which O’Keeffe donated to the school in 1949. Fisk wants to sell a fifty percent share of the collection for thirty million dollars to the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas. The school and the museum, founded by Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton, would each house the collection and pay for its maintenance. The school hopes the infusion of cash will lead to more donations, and that Fisk could raise $150 million for its endowment. The state says O’Keeffe donated the prized collection for the benefit of Fisk students and local citizens, not to leverage money. Testimony at the trial showed the gift, from the beginning, was an enormous financial burden on the school because it had to pay to house, maintain and secure the artwork. It could cost Fisk approximately $1.4 million a year to maintain the artwork. State officials believe that under the proposed deal, Fisk could wind up losing its share of the artwork if the school cannot afford the costs to maintain the art. O’Leary testified the school has been running deficits for the last few years and is being monitored by an accreditation agency because of its poor financial condition. “Fisk is struggling for life,” she said.
  • 18

    Manchester Metropolitan University’s £25 Million Art Studios to Start Next Year

    Construction of new £25 million art and design studios for Manchester Metropolitan University is likely to start early next year, reports the Manchester Evening News. The six story hi-tech building with a rooftop exhibition area and the latest design and media labs will sit next to the historic Grosvenor Building. The contract, currently out to tender, will also see the refurbishment of the 30,000-square-foot Chatham Building and the construction of 26,000 square feet of studio space on the site of the undercroft building at All Saints. Architects Fielden Clegg Bradley have already been appointed to design the new building and the refurbishment. Some necessary demolition on site was begun last month by Connell Brothers. The ambitious project is being entirely funded by the MMU so unlike many other projects will not be recent cuts in grant funding. The MMU's Birley Fields education and health campus in Hulme has had its NWDA funding withdrawn. New masters courses are being launched in photography and filmmaking and there will be a new undergraduate programme in Interactive and Broadcast Media. The school will also work closely with the university’s scientists and engineers on concepts for the computer games industry.
  • 13

    IAE Nice Partners with Saint Paul de Vence Commune for New Arts Management Program

    L’Institut d’Administration des Entreprises in Nice and the Commune of Saint Paul de Vence will be offering a new Masters 2 in management with a specialization in arts: after several months of preparation, negotiations, and doubts, the program has been put into place. This diploma was born from a partnership between the University Nice Sophia Antipolis through the UFR Literature, Arts, and Social Sciences, the Institute of Business Administration, and the commune of Saint-Paul de Vence. It is based on the principle that students profit from delocalized courses, based in Saint-Paul de Vence, in the proximity of art professionals. On September 27, 2010, twenty-five students will arrive at the Verdet Space at Saint Paul de Vence to participate in the courses offered by the IAE of Nice. An interview in French with David Terrematte, coordinator of the project and Rene Buron, mayor of Saint Paul de Vence, can be found here.
  • 12

    Kennesaw State University Receives $2 Million Pledge to Build Art Museum

    The Victoria Advocate reports that Kennesaw State University has been given a two-million-dollar pledge to build an art museum to house its permanent collection. University officials say retired carpet industry executive Bernard A. Zuckerman made the pledge. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution says the offer requires the school to raise at least one million dollars in the next ten months. The school now owns about one thousand pieces. Zuckerman’s late wife, Ruth, was a sculptor, and the museum will house a collection of about one hundred of her pieces donated by her husband after her death in 1997. The school also will display pieces by N.C. Wyeth, Marc Chagall, Norman Rockwell, Howard Finster, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.
  • 11

    North Carolina Arts Council Presents Over $175,000 in Grants

    Amanda Lucci reports for Star News Online that the arts will be a little richer in New Hanover, Brunswick, and Pender counties this year after local projects and programming received more than $175,000 in grant money from the North Carolina Arts Council. Announced at a press conference Monday in Durham by North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources Secretary Linda A. Carlisle, the council presented $7.4 million total in grants to support local arts organizations across the state. Arts grants hold a high importance to resort towns like Wilmington, said Deborah Velders, director of the Cameron Art Museum. The museum received $53,892 in state arts resources, about $1,000 more than it received last year. “We didn’t get an education grant, which we had gotten before, but we did get a little bit more for general operating to keep our doors open and our lights on,” Velders said. “It’s a hard economy, but people have been really generous and really supportive.” Other beneficiaries in New Hanover County include the Cucalorus Film Festival, which received $16,000 in grants; the DREAMS Center for Arts Education, which received $27,497; University of North Carolina Wilmington’s Office of Cultural Arts, which received $15,000; and UNCW Presents master classes and workshops, which received $5,000. In Brunswick County, the Brunswick County Academy residency with poet, educator and performer Glenis Redmond received $6,000, and the Brunswick Arts Council received $30,512 for grassroots arts programming. The Pender Arts Council in Pender County was also given a grant for grassroots programming in the amount of $17,596.
  • 10

    University of Delaware Works With State Heritage Museum in St. Petersburg

    The University of Delaware’s department of Art Conservation has welcomed Russia’s State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg to the list of international institutions with which it is sharing its expertise. The training effort is part of a four-year, $3.4 million initiative supporting photograph conservation at the Hermitage led by the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. From July 5-12, in the art conservation laboratories at Winterthur Museum and Country Estate, Debra Hess Norris, UD’s Henry Francis du Pont chair of Fine Arts, chair of the department of Art Conservation and vice provost for graduate and professional education, and assistant professor Jennifer Jae Gutierrez presented a workshop on the conservation of 19th-century photographic print materials to three Hermitage staff. They included Natalya Avetyan, curator of photographs in the Hermitage department of Russian History and Culture; Natalya Laitar, conservator of paper and oriental painting; and Tatyana Sayatina, conservator of organic materials and leader of the museum’s future photograph conservation laboratory. “Our July workshop was the first training opportunity in this project to be held in the United States. It was a pleasure to have our colleagues here in Delaware, and I look forward to continuing this collaboration,” Gutierrez said. “The University of Delaware Department of Art Conservation is delighted to be involved in this initiative, which continues the Mellon Foundation’s longstanding commitment to photograph conservation,” Norris noted. “The State Hermitage Museum has some of the finest collections in the world, including hundreds of thousands of photographs, and we are very pleased to share our knowledge with our international colleagues.”
  • 09

    L’École des Beaux-Arts de Nantes to Host 2010 ELIA Conference

    L’Etudiant reports that L’École des Beaux-Arts de Nantes in Frances has been chosen as the site of this year’s annual convention held by ELIA (the European League of Institutes of the Arts), which will take place October 27-29. Based in Amsterdam, this association of art schools includes 350 establishments in forty-seven countries, representing 250,000 students. It acts on behalf of schools of visual art, but also of schools of architecture, dance, theater, and music. This year’s topic will be “how art and culture can be associated with the urban development.” And the town of Nantes has made large efforts in this direction, in particular with creation on the island of Nantes, entirely dedicated to schools of creative arts. Within five years, this district which sheltered a shipyard a long time, will accommodate 2,500 public and private school students. “This regrouping will allow us improved international visibility,” comments on Pierre-Jean Galdin, director of L’école supérieure des beaux-arts de Nantes métropole (ESBANM), who has stated that he is “very proud” to be welcoming ELIA’s convention this year.
  • 05

    New Communications Design Head at Vienna’s Universität für Angewandte Kunst

    Horizon reports that the creative managing director of Scholz & Friends Berlin, Matthias Spaetgens, will lead the communication design division, with emphasis on advertisement, at the Universität für angewandte Kunst in Vienna. His position will begin in September and continue for the next five years. The graphic designer, born in Trier in 1973 has received numerous honors, including ten Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival awards and six Grand Prix awards at Kreativfestivals.

    Pratt Receives Grant to Collaborate With Brooklyn Institutions

    Pratt Institute School of Information and Library Science (SILS) has received $971,407 from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to collaborate with the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), Brooklyn Museum (BM), and Brooklyn Historical Society (BHS) on a three-year program titled “Project CHART (Cultural Heritage, Access, Research and Technology)” to prepare information professionals as digital managers for cultural heritage institutions. Funded by the IMLS as part of the 2010 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program, Pratt will recruit eighteen master’s degree students over the next three academic years to participate in internships across the BPL, BM, and BHS and as team members on Project CHART, which aims to digitize nearly 15,000 images in the partners’ photographic collections. The partners will also produce a project Web portal, hosted by BPL, which will disseminate project results and use social media to provide public access to the digital photographic collections of the three institutions as well as content illuminating the social and cultural contexts and significance of the collections. “We feel honored and inspired to have been awarded this IMLS grant,” said Tula Giannini, dean of Pratt-SILS and project director. “It opens up a world of new opportunities for collaboration, research and for developing a cutting-edge certificate program and curriculum in digital management for cultural heritage institutions designed to prepare our students to assume leadership roles for creating and advancing the emerging digital landscape for museums, libraries and archives.”
  • 04

    Guangzhou Opens Opera House and Children’s Art Center

    Joyce Hor-Chung Lau reports for the International Herald Tribune that the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, surrounded by factory towns, opened its new Guangdong Museum and Guangzhou Opera this spring. On tap are a public library and a children’s art center. The government has not put a price tag on the entire project, though media reports have estimated that the four venues will cost 3.4 billion renminbi, about $500 million. Guangzhou hopes to unveil the complex by November, when it plays host to the Asian Games. Months after the museum’s opening in May, workers are drilling and hammering amid piles of dirt and rubble to prepare the rest of the complex. The opera house and the museum are open for business—two beautiful architectural models rising from a junkyard. But the transport hub, taxi stands, and pedestrian walkways have not been completed, causing crowd and traffic problems, particularly when the opera lets out in bad weather. Rocco Yim, the Hong Kong architect who designed the museum, reported to cost 900 million renminbi, stood at its entrance and pointed past the construction site to the spaceship-like opera house designed by the London-based architect Zaha Hadid for an estimated 1.4 billion renminbi. “The two will be connected by a wide pedestrian avenue,” Yim said, “so people can walk right from the opera to the museum through open green space. Here will be a large slope where people can lie down in the grass. Roadside pollution will be cut down by diverting vehicular traffic underground.” The museum is an enormous cube made of gray and red puzzle pieces that light up with a scarlet glow at night. “I wanted to create the feeling of a lacquered Chinese jewelry box,” Yim said, “an exquisite container holding valuables inside.” Liu Xiaolu, a Guangzhou Opera spokesman, said: “In a short period of time it has changed the cultural scene here, which was relatively limited until recently. Before it was just Beijing and Shanghai. Major international productions, whether it was opera or pop music, would pass right over us and go straight to Hong Kong. We just didn’t have the venues. We didn’t even have a stage large enough to fit all the swans in Swan Lake. Now it’s Guangzhou’s turn.” In its first two months, the house put on three fully staged operas, all of which were well attended. Liu noted that they had a good number of visitors from Hong Kong for the opening show, Puccini’s Turandot.
  • 03

    Curatorial Curriculum Proposed for India

    Darshana Chaturvedi for the Times of India reports that suspended professor Shivaji Panikkar awaits for MS University (MSU) authorities to accept his resignation, he is planning to nurture next generation curators. Former head of department of arts and aesthetics, Panikkar who had faced ire in an obscenity fight, is busy giving shape to a curatorship curriculum. Along with Association of Academics, Artists, and Citizens for University Autonomy (ACUA) and Santhosh Sadanandan, Panikkar has conceptualized “Curating Indian Visual Culture: Theory and Practice” a traveling workshop series, the first of which will be hosted in the city in September. Five national workshops will be held in different parts of the country with national and international experts invited as speakers. The initiative is supported by India Foundation for the Arts (IFA), which is funded by Sir Dorabji Tata Trust. “At present, there are no institutions in our country where curating course is conducted. One of the crucial reasons behind the glaring absence of critical curating in India is the lack of supportive institutional systems that encourage and enable the practitioners in the field to conceptualize and materialize their critical quests. Recognizing the dire need for curatorial studies, we decided to hold workshops to give shape to a program which can be adopted by art schools,” said Panikkar. During the six-day workshops, there will be deliberations, discussions, and ideation addressing the issues in the current curating context, builds an academic discourse around the practice of critical curating, while keeping institutional development at the foreground of the program. Some of the top names from the art field across the globe have been invited as resource persons. These include Geeta Kapur, Sudhir Patwardhan, Ashish Rajadhyaksha, Jyotindra Jain, Vivan Sundaram, Rahab Alana, and Raimi Olakunle Gbadamosi. “One can say that the foundation stone of this course will be laid in our city,” Panikkar shared.
  • 02

    Gretchen Dietrich Named Director of University of Utah’s Art Museum

    Gretchen Dietrich has been named executive director of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts reports the Salt Lake Tribune. Dietrich has been interim director of the museum since April 2009. The University of Utah’s search committee was unanimous in recommending her for the permanent position, according to a statement released Thursday by the Utah’s College of Fine Arts. “I’m very excited I get to keep going with all we started here,” said Dietrich. “This means a lot to me, because the university conducted a national search and did it right. I’m humbled and thrilled.” Raymond Tymas-Jones, associate vice president for the arts at the college, praised Diet­rich’s skills and expertise. “She is a proven administrator with an appetite for improving practices and she has a track record for making museums accessible to a diverse public,” said Tymas-Jones.