Announcements

Thierry de Duve and Okwui Enwezor to speak at Stony Brook Manhattan

Annette Messager, Motion/Emotion, 2012. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/Paris; ADAGP Paris 2012. Exhibition view, La Triennale, Intense Proximité, 2012. Palais de Tokyo Paris.

Spring 2013 Art History & Criticism Lecture Series

Stony Brook University (SUNY)

Stony Brook Manhattan
101 East 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016

www.art.sunysb.edu

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The graduate students of the Art History & Criticism program at Stony Brook University are pleased to announce the 2013 Art History & Criticism Lecture Series.

The series is intended to foster dialogue and develop camaraderie across institutions, and to provide insight into works and practices that have especially influenced recent scholarship.

All lectures are free and open to the public.

Friday, February 22, 6:30pm
Thierry de Duve: “The Invention of Non-Art”
Professor Emeritus, Université Lille 3
2012–13 William C. Seitz Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Monday, April 29, 6:30pm
Okwui Enwezor: “Intense Proximity: Concerning the Disappearance of Distance”
Director, Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany

For more information, please contact SbArhLectureSeries@gmail.com.

The Department of Art History at Stony Brook University offers a dynamic and interdisciplinary program of art history, criticism and theory at M.A. and Ph.D. levels. Ideally located halfway between the art centers of New York City and the Hamptons, Stony Brook offers a unique opportunity to study in a quiet and spacious setting while maintaining close contact with the pulse of the art world. The goals of the program include the development of the critic-historian, who can combine the various fields of traditional art historical study with a critical consciousness and awareness of broad intellectual issues involved in such study; the development of alternative perspectives on art, popular culture and visual culture; the development of practicing art critics; the interdisciplinary study of 19th- and 20th-century art; and the study of the history of art criticism. For more information, visit www.art.sunysb.edu.

The 2013 Art History and Criticism Lecture Series is generously supported by the Stony Brook Graduate Students Organization, the Building Graduate Communities Initiative of the Graduate School, and the Department of Art History at Stony Brook University.